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Parents

Awards Network for Parents

Young people have the right to be successful. Parents and carers have a responsibility to make a positive difference by supporting and encouraging young people to reach their potential. Learning outside of school, such as through youth work awards, is as important as formal learning.

The development, learning and experiences that young people gain in youth work situations… can have a positive impact which is lifelong…(providing) young people developmental opportunities as well as the ability to lead, take responsibility, make decisions…

– National Youth Work Strategy 2014 – 2019, YouthLink Scotland, 2014


Youth Work Awards

The Awards Network is a forum of providers of non-formal learning awards across Scotland. We work together to promote and recognise the achievements of young people through youth work awards. We value young people’s voluntary effort to develop their own skills and improve the communities around them.

Young people achieve awards across all areas of our community, from youth clubs and uniformed organisations to schools and outdoor spaces, care work and campaigns. These can be local, national and international. Awards can be supported by paid staff and by volunteers, and can be self-guided by the young people themselves. They can lead to credit-rated qualifications; nationally recognised programme awards; or nominated awards that celebrate exceptional achievements.

Why is it important to recognise young people’s achievements?

Because young people say so

Young people value awards programmes for fun, friendship, challenge, new skills and experiences that look great on a CV. Many young people want to engage in their communities and improve the quality of life for people around them. Personal reward is not the motivator, but the possibility of using their experience towards a recognised Award and as a way of strengthening their CV and enhancing their career prospects can be a real bonus.

Because educationalists say so

All children and young people are entitled to have the full range of their achievements recognised and to be supported in reflecting and building on their learning and Achievements.

– Building the Curriculum 5 – a framework for assessment: recognising achievement, profiling, reporting, Scottish Government. 12/2010

The Curriculum for Excellence requires schools to recognise the breadth of young people’s achievement, to include achievements gained outside of school through e.g. youth work, volunteering and hobbies, and not simply their ability to pass exams. This means that there is a growing role for community activities to support and complement school based learning.

Because employers say so

Business is clear – we need an education system which develops rigorous, rounded and grounded young people. This means a system which focuses as much on the development of key attitudes and attributes – such as confidence, resilience, enterprise, ambition – as on academic progression and attainment.

– Delivering Excellence – an approach for schools in Scotland, CBI, 3/2015

Any job requires a set of technical skills, but employees also need a range of ‘soft skills’. Employers increasingly recognise how youth work awards help young people develop these ‘soft skills’, and consequently make them more valuable as employees in the workplace.

Some of our Awards

Lifeskills Challenge

Lifeskills Challenge

This e-learning resource – www.lifeskillschallenge.org.uk – allows schools, colleges and other providers to personalise their learners' curriculum and meet their individual needs. Choose from an… more

SQA Leadership Awards

SQA Leadership Awards

The Leadership Award is available at SCQF level 5 and 6. The Leadership Award develops knowledge of leadership skills, styles and qualities. It is designed… more

Personal and Social Development (PSD)

Personal and Social Development (PSD)

The Personal and Social Development (PSD) qualifications offer imaginative ways of supporting young people in becoming confident individuals who are physically, emotionally and socially healthy;… more

Community Achievement Award

Community Achievement Award

The Community Achievement Awards are context-independent and designed to support, recognise and accredit learning and achievement in a community setting. They are designed for delivery… more

What can you do?

  • Use the Award Finder to help your child identify the award or range of awards that might best suit their learning needs, interests or ambitions – and encourage positive engagement.
  • Encourage your child to share information about their achievements, record them on their Pupil Profiles and have these recognised and celebrated by their school.
  • At school parents evenings ask how the school promotes and recognises non-academic achievement.

Related Links

Amazing Things

A Directory of Youth Awards in Scotland

Statement on the Nature and Purpose of Youth Work

Sets out the essential and definitive features of youth work

What is Achievement?

The importance of achievement, outlined in Educations Scotland’s Parentzone

CASE STUDIES

Bethan - Youth Awards open to all

Bethan outlines how she has benefitted from participation in the awards programme of Girlguiding. Having gained a Girlguiding Young Leader Qualification, she is now a Girlguiding volunteer, passing on her learning to other girls and young women. The skills acquired through her awards are equipping… Read More

Lauren

Lauren, 18, is working on her leadership qualification to become a Guide Leader with the 295thGlasgow Guide Unit. She’s also a member of Girlguiding Glasgow’s Croftfoot Senior Section. Her leadership qualification is part of working towards her prestigious Queen’s Guide qualification, the pinnacle of achievement… Read More